Author Archives: sewvacoutletblog

About sewvacoutletblog

Brad Porterfield is the owner of Humble Sewing Center. He's been in the sewing machine and vacuum business since the late 70’s. In the early days, Brad started from the ground up in sales, service, and repair as an employee of a sewing machine store in Arkansas. He eventually became a factory trained technician for all brands including: Elna, Viking, Brother, Singer, Bernina, Janome, and Babylock. Brad later decided to venture out into retail and has successfully owned and operated a number of prosperous sewing machine stores including Meyerland Sewing Center. He purchased Humble Sewing Center in 1997 from the original owner, Bob Crain. Brad remains committed to quality and premium customer service. Humble Sewing Center continues to serve the Houston, Humble, Kingwood, and Atascocita areas, and we look forward to seeing you soon.

Stabilizer Tip – Perfect Stick Stabilizer & Adhesive Sew & Wash

In addition to our Sew Vac Outlet branded stabilizer, we now carry Floriani products.

Perfect Stick Tear AwayWith Floriani Perfect Stick, embroidery in almost any area is achievable! Enjoy quality stitching with no residue build up or gummy needles. Floriani Perfect Stick is ideal for hard to hoop items such as bulky towels, backpacks, collars, napkin corners, or socks. Also use for fabrics that can be damaged by the hooping process. You can prevent Hoop Burn. embroidery on  fabrics like leather, velvet, ultra-suede and satin easily. With Perfect Stick you will enjoy the stability of a firm yet flexible stabilizer that will support all types of embroideries on most fabrics.

A similar stabilizer is Adhesive Sew & Wash. The difference is that Adhesive Sew & Wash dissolves in warm water. It does not tear away. Adhesive Sew & Wash is sold under the Sew Vac Outlet brand.

When using either stabilizer, I like to cut the stabilizer about 1″ larger than my inside hoop. I peel off the paper from the entire piece. Then, I place the inside hoop on top of the “sticky” side of the stabilizer and wrap it around the edges of the hoop. This provides for a no slipping of the stabilizer in the hoop. Place the item to be embroidered on top of the sticky stabilizer.

Bias binding with the Adjustable Bias Binding Foot.

Babylock and Husqvarna Viking offer an adjustable bias binding foot.

Description:
Attach 1/4” to 3/4” wide bias binding in place with either straight or decorative stitches using this adjustable foot. This is the foot for attaching pre-packaged and pre-pressed binding. It’s capable of handling a variety of binding widths and decorative stitches.

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The adjustable bias binder is a clear plastic foot with a screw and markings on the foot that allow for the adjustment of the width of the finished binding. The width of the finished binding is determined and the foot is adjusted to achieve the desired width.

MACHINE SETTINGS Stitch: Straight, zigzag or all forward decorative stitches Stitch length: Pre-set Stitch width: Pre-set Tension: Pre-set

The Baby Lock Adjustable Bias Binder Foot is a useful foot whether you are a beginner or an experienced sewer. When using the Adjustable Bias Binder Foot you are able to use various widths of bias binding. Then, use either straight or decorative stitches to sew the binding in place.

1. Thread with sewing thread on top and in the bobbin.
2. Snap on the Adjustable Bias Binder.
3. Use the screw on the right side of the bracket to adjust the width of the opening to fit the bias tape.
4. Cut the end of the bias tape to a 45 degree angle. Insert the bias tape from the outside of the bracket, into the slot that matches its width, and pull it down under the foot.
5. Place the edge to be bound into the groove on the left side of the bracket.
6. Loosen the screw on the top, in the back of the foot and adjust the bracket as needed.
7. Select a narrow zigzag, a straight stitch or a decorative stitch. Sew slowly, keeping the fabric to be bound, snugly in the groove as you sew.

Use the Adjustable Bias Binder Foot when applying bias to vests, placemats, wall hangings, baby bibs or many other things.

Babylock Bias Binder Foot (Adjustable) (ESG-ABB).
Husqvarna Viking Adjustable Bias Binder Foot (412 98 50-45)

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Hand Quilting by Machine with your Janome

Hand-Stitched By Machine

Would you liketo create the look of hand-work using your sewing machine? This technique is perfect for attaching a bias binding to finish a garment or craft project. A bias binding can be added to a skirt, top, and pants in place of the hem. If you use a contrasting fabric, or the same fabric, the look will different than the main part of the garment just because the fabric is cut on the bias. bias binding is a great finish for necklines and sleeves, too.

Supplies:
Bias binding (or bias strips from the same or contrasting fabric)
Adjustable Blind Hem “G” foot
Contrasting thread

Instructions:
1. Sew the right side of one raw edge of the bias binding to the wrong side raw edge of your project using straight stitch #1.
2. Fold the bias strip to the front side of your project. Pin in place.
3. Attach the “G” foot to the Memory Craft 11000.
4. Select Stitch Q #18.
5. Set stitch width to 3.0, length to 1.5.
6. Adjust the moveable guide on the “G” foot along the fold so that the straight stitch portion of the stitch lines up next to the outer folded edge of the bias strip. The left swing of the needle should pierce the bias strip.
7. Attach the bias strip in this manner along the entire area to be sewn, producing a hand-stitched look.

To create an invisible appliquè look, use matching thread or invisible thread.

The Janome “G” foot (also known as the “Blind Hem Foot”) fits most top-loading Janome models.

Hand Quilting Stitch
Janome MC11000 Stitch: Q #18
MC6600P Stitch M2 #36
Jem Stitch #40

* This technique can also be done on other Janome sewing machines, Babylock sewing machines, Viking machines, and othe brand machines. The stitch selection will depend on your specific model.

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Sewing for Girls and their Dolls.

How many of you have daughters or granddaughters that have an American Girl doll? If so, do the girls like to dress like their dolls? I know that I have a few granddaughters that like to have matching dresses for themselves and their dolls. I’ve spent many hours creating the outfits for them.

Nancy Zieman recently had a “you tube” video on the subject. I thought that I would share it with you. Nancy shows you how to use an open toe foot to stitch ribbon to fabric; she uses a special “pinning” technique. She also demonstrates how to use the ruffler foot.

Tips on Using a Wing Needle

I recently did a class where we used a wing needle. We tried different stitches on the machine to see what the results would be. As everyone tried the different stitches, they shared the results with others in the class. Each person kept their samples and made a note of the stitch that they used for that sample. It was a fun to see everyone enjoy creating beautiful stitches with a wing needle.

If you have never used a wing needle, now might be the time to try one. A WING NEEDLE is used to produce beautiful heirloom sewing effects. Use those heirloom stitches on your sewing machine and a natural fabric and fine thread for the best results.  When the needle goes through the fabric, the wings push the yarns of the fabric to the sides, creating holes. The more often the needle goes through the same hole, the more pronounced the opening is. Most machines have decorative stitches that can be used to create even more intricate decorative effects, such as blanket stitch, honeycomb, stars – even stitches designed to produce the look of purchased entredeux. Wing needle stitching is a quick and easy embellishment for purchased items – linen and/or cotton shirts, tablecloths & napkins – anywhere you want a subtle decorative touch.

A wing needle can be used for embroidery too. Use your wing needle for the parts of your design that have running stitches, motif fills, or bean
stitches. Stitch a test design first to make sure that you are happy with the results. When using a wing needle in embroidery, slow down the speed of stitching on your machine.

Tips for using your wing needle:

  1. Do not use your needle threader with a wing needle.
  2. Use a light weight embroidery thread, the same or one shade darker than your fabric.
  3. Use some stabilizer under your fabric, and if the holes are not defined enough, use a double layer.
  4. Go slow, and try not to stop while stitching, this can cause an uneven and misaligned row of stitches.
  5. Natural and loosely woven fabrics work the best.
  6. Have fun!

Introducing the new Janome Horizon Memory Craft 12000

Janome Horizon Memory Craft 12000The Horizon Memory Craft 12000 will expand your sewing, quilting and embroidery to new horizons. You can see the Horizon Memory Craft at Sew Vac Outlet (Humble Sewing Center) on Saturday, October 1, 2011. 

This top of the line Janome sewing/embroidery machine has a 15″ embossed stainless steel plate in the bed and 11″ to the right of the needle; it has the most workspace of any Janome. It has the largest, most stable embroidery system we’ve ever developed. And an amazing list of new features.

The Horizon Memory Craft 12000 will change the way you create, and make the creative journey more enjoyable than ever before.

Real-Time PC Connection With Horizon Link™ 
Create and edit designs on the touchscreen in real time on your computer. Use your mouse to drag, drop and edit. This means your editing screen can be as large as your computer monitor. Or take your laptop with you to edit on the go.

AcuFeed Flex™ Layered Fabric Feeding System
Our AcuFeed™ system has been a favorite among quilters for its amazing precision and power. Now it’s even better. AcuFeed Flex™ is easy to remove and comes in two widths with multiple feet to address different tasks.

Create Your Own Stitches
Design your own original decorative stitches from scratch. Using the Stitch Composer,™ it’s easy. And your Memory Craft 12000 can use your new creation just like one of its own built-in stitches, altering length and width and adding it to combinations.

The Linear Motion Embroidery System™
It slips neatly onto the back of your machine to give you a bigger embroidery area than ever before, with even greater accuracy. So discreet and sleek, you can leave it attached for regular sewing. And it’s the only home-use sewing machine to allow Free Arm embroidery.

Then there’s the 9mm Stitch WidthAuto Presser Foot LiftOne Step Needle Plate ConversionVariable Width Zigzag during FMQ, and so much more.

Introducing the New Baby Lock Ellisimo Gold

Baby Lock recently introduced a new Ellisimo Gold.  New features in the Ellisimo include color visualization and the on screen designer. You can also resize embroidery designs on the Ellisimo Gold up 200% and down 60% while adjusting the density for the perfect embroidery.

Introducing the Ellisimo Gold from Baby Lock from Tacony Corporation on Vimeo.

How to Embroidery a Baby Onesie

How to embroidery a baby onesie.

Embroidered Onesie
Embroidered Onesie

For a onesie:

  1. Fuse No Show Fusible to the back of the onesie
  2. Cut a piece of Adhesive Sew and Wash stabilizer about 1″ larger than the hoop.
  3. Peel off the paper, then wrap Adhesive Sew and Wash stabilizer around the hoop the hoop.
  4. Turn the onesie inside out.
  5. Place the onesie on top of the stabilizer.
  6. Using straight pins or small binder clips hold the fabric e the neck area away from the embroidery. Be careful to keep your fingers away from the needle.
  7. After the embroidery is finished. Soak the onesie in warm water to remove the Adhesive Sew and Wash stabilizer.
  8. Peel the No Show Fusible up and trim around the embroidery.
  9. Fuse a piece of Fuse So Soft on top of the embroidery so that no stitches touch the baby’s skin.

Introducing our NEW Blog.

Humble Sewing CenterHi, I’ve just returned from BabyLock Tech where I learned some many new and interesting things, not just about sewing, quilting, and embroidery but more importantly how to keep our customers, friends, and followers informed about sewing, quilting, and embroidery.

So, while on the plane home, I thought about changing our blog. Instead of telling you want is happening at the store, we are going to use the blog to give you tips, techniques, with answers to the How to questions, a Did you know section, and news about new products, updates on existing products and so much more.

We are open to your suggestions and ideas on how to make a blog a useful tool for you.

We invite you to join us on our new exciting journey on the internet with our blog, our facebook page, and twitter.

Thank you for your interest and for your support.